Author Archives: Matt

Grannies Gone Wild: Baran Studio in San Francisco Magazine

We were recently listed as a Granny Whisperer in San Francisco magazine for our work on Accessory Dwelling Units, The Buena Vista project in particular, which is currently under construction. You can find the whole article in their online edition here.

In the meantime, here is a shot of the project as it will soon appear:

Posted in News, Projects

Haskell Street in the New York Times

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On Sunday, the New York Times Business Section ran a story on the front page titled Getting to Yes on NIMBY Street. It’s about California’s housing crisis, and how a series of smaller projects can have a large impact in aggregate. It is written around the 3 homes that we designed on Haskell Street in Berkeley as an example of how neighborhoods are rejecting this type of housing and in effect worsening the problem, not just of high housing costs, but of sustainability

The cover image is of another project we did in Berkeley, on 9th and university. It is a great example of how projects like this end up integrating into a neighborhood. When we return, now years after construction, the neighborhood is just as peaceful as when we arrived, and the controversy long forgotten. As more of these projects come to realization, there will likely be fewer words about them in the New York Times; they will become the norm.

Posted in News, Observations, Projects

AIA East Bay Merit Award for MacArthur Annex

We are excited to announce our MacArthur Annex project has won an AIA East Bay Merit Award for Design. You can find images for the project here.

The jury likened the project to an ‘punk pompidou center’ and the interior to that of a submarine. We are flattered.

Thanks and congratulations to everyone who helped make this project a reality. Travis Tarr, Ryan Heath and Cheryl Lima at Baran Studio, Eitan Spanner at Uunlimited, Dennis Gillespie, Landscape Designer Nate Parsley at Green Gallery, Sterling Silver, Steve Steele, Joel DiGiorgio at Farm League and Arthur Mac’s Tap and Snack, Subrosa Coffee and Wylie Pryce Design, Ben Frombgen at BCooperative, EP Building, Contact Records, The Hanged Man Co., La Loba, and Foggy Notion.

 

 

Posted in News

SF Business Times: Baran Studio Designed Townhomes Sell Out

Excerpt from the SF Business Times:

Exclusive: Developer sells out West Oakland townhomes, plans three more projects

Developer City Ventures has sold all 171 townhomes at its Station House project in West Oakland, the city’s only new for-sale development in nearly a decade.

The project, at 14th and Wood streets, opened late last year and had prices from $600,000 to $900,000. Townhomes range from 1,300 to 2,000 square feet, with two or three bedrooms. Oakland’s median home value is around $687,000, according to Zillow.

Patrick Hendry, City Ventures vice president of Northern California, said the project’s proximity to downtown Oakland and the Bay Bridge to San Francisco was a major asset in attracting buyers. The price of the project – about a third of the price per square foot for San Francisco condos – also helped. With low interest rates, some buyers’ mortgage payments were less than paying market-rate rents, said Hendry.

“We underestimated the demand. Our sales pace has been unprecedented,” said Hendry.

Baran Studio Architecture designed Station House. City Ventures is its own general contractor.

Posted in News

On the Market: West Oak 6

Check out the WestOak6, now on the market! More images of the project here.

 

Posted in News

Baran Studio Architecture with Bob Vila

Check out our project and others on BobVila.com, Rescued from Ruin: 9 Extreme Makeovers You Need to See

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MacArthur Annex on 7×7

The MacArthur Annex is in the news again, this time in 7×7. You can check it out here

Posted in News

Provacative and Unprofessional

While it’s useful to rely on consistency and standardization when it comes to making buildings, it doesn’t typically inspire creativity. Lately I’ve been interested in the limitations of professionalism and the repression of critical thinking, in part because I haven’t heard much discussion on the subject. I believe alternative viewpoints warrant consideration, particularly when the volume of one particular point of view is loudest. 

Unprofessional Architecture, Bolivia. 

Magazines and architecture blogs give us competition winners and glossy images of spectacular, high priced forms and precision crafted details. In my view, big budgets often lack a certain degree of challenge; it is often easier to start new than to sort out how to work with what you have in front of you. Moreover, these promoted forms and details often follow formulas that were established long ago, furthering the ease of use and circumventing imagination. Projects that don’t follow the correct formulas are passed over.

In the current cultural climate, it is difficult to find architecture that embraces the rough or raw.  Slipshod, slapdash, bricollaged, improvised, and the mashed up are not typically part of the architectural discussion. With enough promotion, it’s easy to see how a cycle of convention perpetuates itself.  The consumption of culture catalyzes its own acceptable ideology. One must follow the standards of the profession, its norms and values, to be seen as valid. The rest is potentially offensive.

Unprofessional Architecture, Vermont

However, looking to the less polished may offer new inspiration. This Jim Jarmusch quote pretty well summarizes why:

“I still consider myself to be an amateur filmmaker. And I say that because in the Latin origin of the word amateur is the word love, and it’s love of a form, whereas professional implies something you do for money or for work.”

The excerpt is from an interview where Jarmusch speaks about Gimme Danger, a new documentary he created about Iggy Pop. His interest in punk rock has to do with the embrace of the amateur. He discusses how that encouraged him to make films before he believed he was really qualified to do so. I can appreciate the perspective. I came of age during the tail end of the punk rock era, and the culture epitomized the unprofessional. I still carry the sensibility with me today. It’s why I’ve suggested that we “make it ugly”, which to me means, try to think from a different perspective.

To be unprofessional is defined by Webster as “below or contrary to the standards expected in a particular profession”. In other words not constrained or tied to a specific methodology.  Too much respect for the established process can cause one to follow the given path too closely, whereas a bit of irreverence allows for exploration out of bounds, where new ideas are formed.  Divergence from the norm provides the opportunity to consider alternatives, even if we’re searching for something very polished in the end. Jarmusche films are case in point.

Thinking or acting outside of conventions or established norms may create discomfort. Provocation can be viewed by the definition ‘to evoke, or stimulate’, as in an intellectual provocation. It asks you to think. In another sense of the word, provocation means to ‘create anger’. In fact they are the same thing in some cases.

Architectural Provocation, Oakland

Thought that occurs outside of conventionally agreed upon ideology may be upsetting to those entrenched. But this type of provocation is essential to our evolution an humans. To quash alternate points of view in favor of the majority is a step backwards in our search for freedom and independent thought.  Those that promote dissent may only be concerned about it when they are in the minority, but when that minority  becomes a majority, it shouldn’t be forgotten.

Allowing space for diversity of thought translates well into the urban environment. I may not believe it is possible to recreate a Victorian Building properly; that it speaks to a different time and is not relevant to the world we live in today. But that doesn’t mean I don’t understand that others disagree. I would never suggest that all Victorians be torn down, or that another should never be built. I only ask that I be allowed to express myself in the way I see fit, unfettered by regulations defined by majority preference. I believe this to be important, as critical thinking and freedom of expression are in many ways at the core of what gives us meaning.

It should be noted that none of this is meant to deny our professional responsibility as architects. Building owners entrust us with large sums of money; the public entrusts us with their safety and well being. These are all responsibilities we should and do take very seriously. At the same time, standards should be periodically scrutinized for relevance to new technologies and ways of life. Only then can we be sure we are performing at our best.

Posted in Academic, Construction, Design, Observations, Theory

Baran Studio Architecture in the SF Chronicle Style Section

The MacArthur Annex Shipping Container ‘Creative Community’ was featured in the San Francisco Chronicle Style Section this past Sunday. The focus is on the variety of individual creative businesses that occupy the project, with some discussion of the architectural intent. One of the most exciting aspects of this project is how it reflects an indirect connection to Oakland, not just to the network of shipping containers (which also connect to a much wider, global context), but also how it relates to the culture of small, independent, creative businesses. The project is a great example of layered connections and adaptations, both by design and as the organic architectural evolution.

Check out the article here.

 

Posted in News

Matt Baran at USC Architecture Generation Next Pecha Kucha

I gave a very short presentation at USC a few weeks ago. For those of you that are not familiar with the Pecha Kucha format, it is intended to be a very focused method for getting an idea across. 20 slides for 20 seconds each to be precise. My presentation was even shorter – 15 slides for 20 seconds each, which gave me about 5 minutes to deliver the idea. More information about Pecha Kucha can be found here.

The video of the presentation is below. There are 20 USC grads in all. I’m 2nd in the lineup, starting around the 6 minute mark. 

 


 

Posted in News